NICOLE GRAU

 

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Every month, we ask one individual in our network a few questions about their way into tech, their motivation and their lessons learned.

This month role model is Nicole Grau. She is an Application Manager for public services and is currently responsible for an application for about 400’000 users.

What valuable advice did you get from your parents?
I am the oldest of 4 daughters and my parents always taught us, that we have to work hard in order to get something accomplished. I kept that in mind and I always search for new challenges. Said that, I have to admit, I haven’t always been working in tech but started my career as a front desk employee. Some day I got offered a job in IT with the possibility to develop my skills in that department and I just couldn’t say no, knowing that I would have to work hard in order to get somewhere 🙂

What aspects of your work are you proudest of?
With my background outside of IT I think I am one of those tech people that never forget that there are people affected with all changes that are made in software. I am proud that even in that technical environment I never forget the people behind and affected by it.

What drives you at work?
I like the fact that I always learn something new in my job. That get’s me up in the morning, knowing that every day brings something different. It never gets boring.

What has been the toughest challenge you faced while working?
When I started working in IT I had the assumption that software is «finished» someday. But working with it every day now I figured out, that I was wrong. At least in my environment, the development of the bigger systems are never finished. There are always some changes that have to be made.

What advice would you give other women?
Every (technical) development that is done working begins to become outdated on the day of its’ completion. As a women in tech you can influence the development and bring other views into a male dominated environment.

ANDREA BERSET

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Every month we ask one individual in our network a few questions about their way into tech, their motivation and their lessons learned.

What valuable advice did you get from your parents?

I think it isn’t one single advice I got from my parents. It’s the attitude of trust and self-confidence they lived and demonstrated every day to us kids. And they gave us love and showed us how to be respectful and kind. If you are fitted with a basic trust then almost everything is possible!

What aspects of work are you proudest of?

In 2015 I started to think about founding my own company. At that time it was all around visualisation and I offered workshops and courses about this subject. I knew that this wasn’t enough and I was interested in humans and their roles in different systems they are living in. So I started a CAS in Coaching and soon recognised, that those two subjects (which are both big passions of mine) can be well connected.

So I think I’m proud of myself that I had the courage to figure out what really matters to me and the intention to follow my goals and dreams. Today I have my own company www.kimia.ch and I am able to do what I love.

What drives you at work?

I think it is my curiosity and the natural interest in people and stories. And the fact that I want to get out the best of every situation, for my clients and their needs.

What has been the toughest challenge you faced while working?

I think it is the fact that you have to get out of your comfort zone again and again and again. Every new job is a challenge. New people, new needs, new settings.  With a good backpack of skills, experiences and methods and with enough self-confidence you are able to face these challenges without breaking down.

What advice would you give other women?

You should be able to get out of your comfort zone every now and then and move further on in the learning zone – every single day.

One for all – all for one

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Sadly, our board member Marike Carsten who supported us for more than 1.5 years is leaving by the end of this year. Marike, your open mind was always a delight and your ability to tackle and get things done was and is pretty amazing – thank you for the time you spent with us and thank you for your good-bye blogpost with the wonderful title «one for all – all for one».

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